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November 11, 2011

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Comments

Jeremy

Wonderful story...as usual!

Ms. Glaze

Thanks Jeremy! I'm missing Paris obviously. What you cookin this year? Any good ideas for pumpkin pack in bread, cakes or muffins? I have a lot of different squash and I'm looking for new ideas...

kate

Love reading this Missy and your three aunts send you lots 'o Alabama love to you.

Craigkite

Great essay! I had fun gathering the fixings for a spaghetti dinner one Christmas in Paris. I hit six different stores to get all the right ingredients. This confirmed how the French stay fit. I walked for close to two hours to fix one meal for two of us. It was a great adventure from start to gluttonous finish. Your prose reminded me of the challenges and triumphs of small apartment cooking in Paris. Drinking wine is a must to make the most out of the event. Thanks for sharing this memory.

Mark

Great post Amy. Brought back great memories of scavenging for Turkey Day goodies during my time in Paris at Le Cordon Bleu. I kept a blog and made an entry of my classmates getting together that day. What a great feeling that was! Thanks for reviving those great times. I miss Paris too!

http://parisandcordonbleu.blogspot.com/2009/11/3rd-weekend-off.html

Calichef

You aren't going to believe this, but the private hunting club I used to work at was a very exclusive club and Judy Jordan, her father and her husband were members! I LOVE J sparkling! (It was the only sparkling wine in my wine cellar, a cellar which was filled only with wines produced by members.) On new year's eve '00 I was at the club preparing a private feast for Judy, her husband, their daughter, his brother and sister-in-law. Judy served the '96 that night, and I swear it was the absolute best sparkling wine I have ever had. If you ever get your hands on a bottle of the '96, if any still exist, save it for something VERY special!

Ms. Glaze

CaliChef! I am so jealous. I would love to meet the owners of J. I really love J sparkling. In fact it's the only American bubbly I think is worth it. Their rosé is lovely too as are their other wines. I've never had a bad vintage or bottle. I have some J champagne in storage but I think they are around the 2004 era and probably in need of drinking... no '96's sadly...

Mark, Thanks for your note! It was fun checking out your LCB blog and reliving it through your eyes. I was the first blogger at LCB and they "caught" me and had a huge meeting with all the teachers about it. However the Cointreau family decided that this was a good thing and great for marketing. Once the teachers knew I was actually taking pictures to post they would ham it up big time! Fun!! What are you doing now?

Craigkite, We just don't understand small kitchen here do we? And I miss that relationship with all my little vendors for fruit, wine, fish, meat, cheese, and bread. Safeway just doesn't have that same sense of community.

Kate, Thanks farmer Kate! Miss my Alabama Aunties!!! Hope the farm is keepin warm this Winter...

Jeremy, Gros Bisous!

Betsy at Zen Mama

I feel like I've just read a chapter of a great book and I want more! So glad to have found your blog today!

Ms. Glaze

Thanks Betsy! Happy New Years!!!

Helen

Oh, how I loved this post! I've never had a rotisserie turkey, but I have a feeling it would be awesome. I love rotisserie chickens, but I find that roasting them in the oven never tastes as good. Since the only turkey I've ever had was the oven type, I like as much as French people do. I tried to sous-vide the breast for one thanksgiving. The meat was good, but I really missed that roasted flavor and crackling skin. I'll have to read your tips on turkey. maybe you'll convert me into a turkey lover after all. Your food is beautiful and I love your writing!

Ms. Glaze

Helen! Sous-viding the breast isn't a bad idea at all. But to get the skin crispy you'll need to pan sear the sucker before serving which could be difficult considering the size. I would think it would be very juicy sous-vided! Did you have a thermo circulator?!?!

home performance energy auditor

Great essay! I had fun gathering the fixings for a spaghetti dinner one Christmas in Paris. I hit six different stores to get all the right ingredients. This confirmed how the French stay fit. I walked for close to two hours to fix one meal for two of us. It was a great adventure from start to gluttonous finish. Your prose reminded me of the challenges and triumphs of small apartment cooking in Paris. Drinking wine is a must to make the most out of the event. Thanks for sharing this memory.

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